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Mice – An Overview of the Mouse

History

The mouse is different things to different people. To young children it is both good and bad – a kind gentle creature in the form of Mickey Mouse or the country mice of Beatrix Potter, or the dark, scary creature seen in movies scurrying in drains. To the scientist it is a laboratory animal that provides a constant source of information, while to the zoologist it is both a fascinating creature to study and the most readily available source of food for reptiles.

The common little house mouse played its part in the largest mass death of we humans – the Black Plague of Europe that killed millions of people in medieval times. Mice can eat their way through millions of tons of grain crops in a year, so it is no wonder that these little rodents have been the target of government attempts to control them. The Egyptians found that cats were the best controllers of mice.

We have tried to poison them out of existence, trap them, burn them, and hunt them – but all to no avail. Wherever humans decide to settle, so will they inherit an attendant mouse population. Humans and their habits provide a generous food source to the mouse population thus creating infestations in our homes and businesses.


Mouse Biology

  • Adult mice typically weigh 10-30 g and have a body length of over 75 m
  • Mice have good senses of smell, taste and hearing, however they have poor vision and are colour-blind.
  • Mice generally move along scent-marked trails and use their long sensitive whiskers as sensors when
    moving at night.
  • Mice are active at night and feed from several sites around the nest.
  • Mice are seldom seen during daylight unless they are at high densities.
  • Females reach sexual maturity at 6 to 10 weeks of age.
  • Conception to birth is 19-21 days and mothers can re-mate immediately after giving birth to produce up to 10 litters per year under ideal conditions.
  • Mice can breed at any time if food is available.An extended breeding season can allow mice to reach plague proportions in just one season but it can take two seasons for a plague to develop.
  • Average litter size is 5 to 6 but can be as high as 13.

 

Where Do Mice Hide?

  • Mice and rats like to hide under sinks
  • Kitchen cabinets
  • Stored food and food storage areas
  • Wall voids, cracks and crevices
  • Inside appliances
  • Closets and pantry's
  • Firewood piles and storage areas
  • Attics, garages, and basements.

 

Common Mouse Misconceptions

Misconception 1
Mice are cute furry little pets.

Reality
Mice are social creatures that are well adapted to handling by both adults and children. As social as mice can be, they can be very timid and if scared or handled roughly can become aggressive and territorial. When handling a pet mouse or rat, children should always be supervised by an adult. It is best to buy a mouse at a pet store as wild or household mice can carry many infectious diseases.


Misconception 2
I've seen the same mouse all around my property. It's probably only one.

Reality
Mice forage only for short distances from their nest, usually not more than 10 to 25 feet. If you see a mouse all around your property, you're probably seeing more than one and there is a a strong possibility that there is a nest nearby.


 

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Where should I place traps if I decide to use them.
A: Place traps and baits perpendicular to the wall and in dark corners, such as behind the stove, refrigerator, washer and dryer or where rodent activity is seen. It is wise to set baits and traps simultaneously in various spots in the home to ensure better control of the problem.


Q: I caught a mouse...what now?
A: Be sure to check traps daily and replace as needed. Wear gloves when disposing of rodents You can also disinfect the area with a household cleaner if you are concerned that there is a possible threat to your health.


Q: How do I know if I have a mouse in my home?
A: Rodents are nocturnal creatures by nature, which means they rarely surface during the daytime hours unless their environment is disrupted. However, there are some signs you can look for: Mouse droppings, black, typically small. Evidence of recent gnawing, especially on packaged goods, cardboard boxes and areas around pipes, ducts and vents. Your dog or cat pawing excitedly at a kitchen cabinet or wall. Burrows or nests in the ground along the outside of buildings.


Q: What preventative measures can I take to ensure a mouse free home?
A: Clean-up common areas, eliminate nesting areas, keep pet areas clean and seal off any potential entrances.

 

 

       

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For information or inquiries, please call (416) 805-5327 or e-mail us at info@leappestcontrol.com.